An Historical Piece for the American Red Cross

Hi everyone, my name is Mohit Jain, and am on the Leadership Team for the National Youth Council. I will be taking over a portion of the blogging. Looking forward to getting to know all our readers!
I wanted to begin with a historical piece that I read in the Washington Post just this last weekend (January 7th by Kathy Lally). It was a truly inspirational piece that aimed to keep the story alive. And hence, I am blogging today to tell you all about this story. The article began with the quotation:
“World War I was drawing to a close in 1918 when American Red Cross volunteers in Russia’s Far East heard rumors about abandoned children, dressed in rags and foraging for food in Siberian forests. They set off on a rescue that would turn into an extraordinary around-the-world journey little known today.
The dominos that caused this to be true began before World War I when thousands of students were kept in the Ural Mountains, so that they could be safe from the devastating effects of WWI, and the toll that it had taken on food availability in the larger cities. A civil war in the Ural Mountains captured about 800 of these captives and they grew malnourished as the winter season approached. And in a 2-year effort, American Red Cross Volunteers took them around the world, and through the Russian landscape, home. One of the rescuers, Molkina said that “the Americans who worked in the American Red Cross were simple people, and those lost children were someone else’s,” Molkina said in an interview. “They didn’t have to do anything, but they did.”
On a daily basis, American Red Cross Youth around the world are making a difference from everyday resources. This is just one incredible story where the American Red Cross has played an important role historically in the lives of thousands nationally.
As always, the NYC loves to hear stories like this, from youth around the United States. Message me your story, and I’ll include them next time!
-Mohit Jain
Leadership Team, National Youth Council

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